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's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
'll debate it. and the protests in cairo, the white house refuses to condemn the egyptian president's dictator-like grab. all of that, and a "hannity" shootout with juan williams and more. "hannity" starts right now. tonight as the fiscal cliff drama unfolds on capitol hill, we'll take a step back and look at how we got to this point. namely, how do we become a nation buried under more than $16 trillion debt, why crippling defense cuts, and the largest tax increase will take hold in 35 days because your elected officials don't know how to stop spending money. let me first play a small part of one of the most memorable inaugural addresses of all time. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> sean: sadly five decades removed from that iconic speech, the democratic party, its leaders, and countless other americans, rely on government for too many things. instead of asking what they can do for their country, they're asking what their country can do for them. now the debt record is at record levels, tax rates are soaring,
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do whatever he wants without any oversight. >> i felt he was telling us, you guys don't exist. it's just me and
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
the border. first i want to go to cairo and reza sayah who's following all the developments there. just a few moments ago, morsi spoke to a huge crowd. what did he say? >> well, he tried to calm things down. he defended his position. he defended the controversial decrees he announced last night telling his opponents that he's part of the revolution, one of the people. certainly at this hour he's got a lot of opponents and critics who do not agree with him and are are expressing their outrage in the streets. dramatic scenes in cairo. very reminiscent of the scenes we saw during the 2011 egyptian revolution. back then it was aimed at former president hosni mubarak. now aimed at mr. morsi. there were some clashes during the protest in tahrir square that are ongoing. the clashes witnesses say were caused by protesters that threw rocks at security forces. the security forces responded by firing tear gas. and back and forth went this cat and mouse game that has been emblematic of these protests. the outranl comes after the decrees last night that many critics are describing as a power grab. one of
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
forward. secretary of state hillary clinton is in cairo. we talked of a cease-fire yesterday at this time and so far there has been no agreement. today's events have pushed off an agreement even further. gregg: leland vittert we'll check back with you. can secretary clinton get both sides to agree on anything or are we in for more violence? jack keane will join us live. >> the labor department just releasing its weekly unemployment claims report. applications falling a little from the week before but still high at 410,000. the labor department blaming the recent spike in claims on superstorm sandy. last week's numbers were the first time we saw above 400,000 in more than a year. we are learning that has been resides up by 12,000. it was originally reported at 439,000 and was 451,000. that's an 8-month high for reporting. gregg: new applications for unemployment benefits fluctuated between 380,000 and 390,000. jobless claims have stayed above 300,000 and spiked in early 2009. they must fall below 375,000 to indicate the job market is strong enough to lower the unemployment rate. >> unions
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
in cairo as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >>> let's make a deal. will the white house and congress finally see eye to eye on the fiscal cliff? we're just over 24024-inch hours from the start of bargaining time. >>> plus -- >> push one of my kids and i will stab you. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and downright rude, and the holiday season has only just begun. -- captions by vitac -- >>> it is sunday, november 25th. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. overnight protesters clashed with security forces. this was the scene in. cnn's reza sayah is live this morning. how far are they actually spreading now? >> randi, the protests seem to be spreading. according to the interior ministry starting last night and continuing on to terrell morning hours, there were protests, demonstrations in the northern city. according to the government officials, they tried to attack the offices of the muslim breerhood and that's when you had clashes between the muslim brotherhood and their supporters and anti-mohamed morsi protesters. there were a number of injuries there. a
in cairo. the u.s. embassy there is closed. no one is being allowed in or out as we speak. >> embassy officials say protesters are blocking the entrance and clashes are happening near nearby. reza sayah is nearby for us. what's happening? >> reporter: there is no indication protesters are targeting the u.s. em wibassy b it was closed as a precaution. these are protesters who clashed with police. these are the trouble-making elements, the teenagers, young men, the 20-somethings who for the past four days vo thrown red sox, debris, molotov cocktails at police. police responded by firing teargas, stun grenades. some police officers have been throwing rocks as well. some of the clashes have been inching toward the assembly which is a couple of blocks from tahrir square. four hours ago the embassy shut its doors saying no one would come in or leave until further notice. more demonstrations scheduled in the days ahead in tahrir square. the embassy announcing that services for american citizens in cairo will be cancelled until further notice. >> this is all over president morsy's power grab.
that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets that were fired into israel. president obama has committed more funding to iron dome. and i think that it really does cement the fact that this president and this administration has been a tremendous
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any dec
will arrive in cairo tomorrow. both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home a message to hamas, that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilianes with impunity. we have been trying to keep down the amount of civilian deaths on their side. compare that to hamas on us. they are trying to maximize the amount of civilians that they kill. that's the different between a terrorist organization and democratic country. >> i think it takes two to tango here. the ambassador knows that israel invoked hamas by taking out one of their -- on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other fashions would retaliate. so they are also to be blamed for the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states, for international community, to force and pressure israel to lift the siege and that i believe will lead it putting an end to these facilities across the border. >> >>> president barack obama is in asia at this hour but not everyone is happy about his latest stop. the important political figure he is
that sparked violent protests around the world including outside the embassy in cairo. since the arab spring we have seen big changesn the volatile region. how will he handle foreign policy in the next four years? we asked our experts. >> i know it's a complicated issue, but is there a way to describe our current foreign policy? >> it's a very complex situation because we have a number of foreign policy problems. iran, syria. evolution of the arab spring and we have number of fundamental changes that is going on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count o
by president mohammed morsi. there were more clashes today. in cairo's tahrir square. police fired tear gas at some of the demonstrators. some of them through the can -- threw canisters back at police. >> iran is showcasing several additions to the navy. missile firing warship launched today near the strait of hormuz. they took liberty of two submarines and hovercrafts. the country nuclear chief says uranium enrichment will move ahead with intensity. he says there will be a sharp increase in number of centrifuges used to make the nuclear fuel. at least 34 people were killed today in twin suicide car bombings in the syrian capital. state media say the bombs ripped through a parking lot near a cluster of commercial buildings in a damascus suburb. rebels are claiming they shot down a syrian air force jet today as well. international momentum may be building for the latest move by palestinians. to get united nations recognition. david lee miller on what the u.s. intends to do. >> on the streets of ramallah, on the west bank. posters can already be seen exclaiming state of palestine, member of t
and turkey, it appears cairo is taking the lead role and trying to negotiate a peace deal between hamas and israel. along the israeli gaza border, david lee miller fox news. >>> some lawmakers today are demanding to know who created the talking points used by the obama administration after the deadly attack on the consulate in benghazi. they want to determine why so many administration official including ambassador to the u.n. susan rice said the attack was related to an anti-muslim video. administration officials defended the initial response saying it came from the best information they had at the time that didn't compromise classified data. >>> we now know more tonight about why the fbi got so involved in the scandal that brought down david petraeus. his former mistress paula broadway is accused -- broadel with a swell accused of sending -- broadwell is accused of sending cyber ep mails to a friend. in this case, the bureau found e-mails that showed they knew the travel schedule. that was enough to keep the fbi involved updating director david mueller and attorney generaleribbing hol
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
willing to listen to the other? up next the negotiations happening right now in cairo. negotiations to end the fighting between israel and hamas. obviou. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting in the drive to end hunger try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
him to account for what he does domestically and regionally. >> in cairo today delegations from israel and hamas are there for indirect talks to work on details beyond the initial cease-fire. i have a list of topics they're expected to cover, opening border crossings, easing israel's economic blockade and what do you expect from these discussions today? what are the chances any progress will be made? >> i think these already tough discussions. all the leverage that comes with having the military action on going is gone now. the pressure to make tough concessions and compromises is diminished and morsi is very distracted biz his own domestic crisis. i think you can have these talks go on for some time without major changes and that sets up the prospect for more conflict in the future. >> during this time if it takes awhile will the cease-fire hold? >> i think right now neither side has interest and i think more israel if iran starts to rearm hamas very quickly and i think they will see that as an untenable situation and it is possible you could over the next weeks see a resumption in so
normal force. >>> and we have brand-new video from cairo where the arab league is holding emergency meetings on the crisis. also today the white house urged diplomacy and a deescalation in the violence. let's get right to it on the ground and inside gaza where rockets are flying overhead. nbc's news correspondent is there for us live. let's get to what's happening right up now around you. >> reporter: well let's start off here with the situation in gaza. right now it is really quiet behind me. the streets of gaza are really empty. most people this time of night go to their homes. the streets are pretty much quiet. people here really bracing themselves for what the night usually brings. what we've seen over the course of the last several nights is an intense aerial campaign by the israeli forces. as you mentioned yesterday, the palestinian prime minister's office was destroyed. these air strikes will be intensifying in the coming hours. that's been the pattern. there's also been palestinian rocket fire coming out of gaza into southern israel. the fear that grips the people here is on
who was definitely pretty tough in his remarks in a news conference out of cairo. he says israel has to make the first move. he was angry with benjamin netanyahu regarding the killing of one of hamas's top military commanders. i want you to listen to what he said this morning. >> translator: today netanyahu wanted to achieve three goals with several messages, but he did not succeed. yes, no doubt he succeeded in assassinating the heroic leader, but he wanted to maintain his ability in deterence, but it failed. >> you have been covering this region for a long time. when you hear him and you hear the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu saying that there is -- they're not going wait around forever here, is this political bluster? is this rhetted rhetoric? is there something more behind this? are we going to see an escalation? >> i think at the moment it does feel like political bluster on all sides. i mean, imagine this as well. when he was speaking there in cairo, at the same time it was just after a building used by palestinian media inside gaza had been struck by israeli missil
the compound in central cairo. the protesters, they are actually not targeting the embassy. they have been demonstrating, however, for a week. there has been some fighting with riot police around tahrir square. they've got rocks, tear gas being hurled in the streets. demonstrators, they are trying to force president mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft of egypt's all-important new constitution. this is going to be the backbone, the centerpiece of egypt's dem
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spontaneously inspired by the protests at the u.s. embassy in cairo involved into a direct assault. i mean it's very consistent. so doesn't all of that point and i agree with you 150%, everybody, you know, wants to understand exactly what happened. but doesn't this seem to vindicate her role when if the cia talking points that were given to susan rice? >> again, soledad, not to me. and i think that most people who are watching this, it is -- it is an attempt, but it falls way short of answering the questions i think that the american people have. and that's what this is really about. so whether it's general petraeus, susan rice, or anyone in the administration, i mean, this is a -- this is an issue of leadership. this is something that the president i think needs to come to the american people and be very straightforward about what happens, why it is that statements were made the way they were at the beginning, why it is that they are changing now, and that -- that as commander in chief, as the president of the united states, this is an opportunity for him to look the american people in the e
. right now, in cairo, there is a seize- on cease-fire discussion. egyptian and turkishes and qataries are mediating it . the israelis are there and both sides want different thengs there. is a lot of pressure on the israelis to come up with a deal and now other arab donors to hamas in the islamic before we enter a ground invasion . that could mean more civilian casulties. and terps of israeli soldiers as well >> leland bidder from the zone over in israel. >> casey mcfar land said expect for monday for something to break. >> you mean the talk or battle. >> she ow thought with battle. first step in keeping twinkies alive. hostess will start selling off their assets. they make twinkies and on ho-hos and wonder bread. companies are interested in buying the businessment hostess had no choice but to close after striking union members refused to return to work. they lost everything thanks to sandy and now the few things they have left are about to be bull dozed to the ground. city of new york is bull dozing homes that are too damage to standment >> we have more strture damage and call the bu
envoy, a special envoy who went to cairo to meet with egyptian officials. the egyptian government, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful day here. pretty much deserted. i just got to an israeli area where there's a shelter for school kids. you hear the sirens going off. as soon as i got here a few hours ago the sirens went off. the soldiers rushed everyone into these bomb shelters, into these areas. you could see why people are terrified about what's going on. apparently in this particular inciden incident, when i heard the thuds, when i heard the sirens going off, the iron dome, this anti-missile system, seemed to have worked. we saw huge plume
understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the chances are actually fairly small. egypt has enough problems with it is with fighting militants next to gaza. egypt says it still respects the camp david peace accord signed with israel back in the late 1970s. obviously, we can expect egyptian politicians and leaders to make as much political hay as possible over this gaza violence, but it's highly unlikely that egypt has really the wherewithal or desire to get sucked into that conflict. i know from speaking to many egyptians, they don't have an appetite for it. they may sympathize with the people of gaza, but that sympathy does not extend to an eagerness or willingness to engage or become involved militarily in that conflict. >> all right, ben. in jerusalem this morning. thanks. >>> coming up later, soledad will be speaking to israel's deputy foreign minister. that's in our 7:00 hour. >>> here at home, president obama will have the four top leaders of congress over to the white house today to begin tal
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